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Green Building For Your Residence

Sunday, 06 May 2018 152
Building a green house addition actually boils down to making the proper decisions in the design and planning stages of your project. That is what this guide is all about. Here's a set of the green wisdom of Johnston, in the kind of tips and hints on green remodeling practices, products, and design features to help guide you in designing the greenest house addition potential. Choosing the Ideal Shade of Green for Your House Addition If you think green is the ideal selection for you, make sure you speak with your contractor about embracing a green building doctrine, locate a contractor that specializes in green construction and remodeling, or seek out the assistance of a green consulting firm that will assist you design and plan the best, and greenest, home improvement potential. Going green with your house addition is a wise move from nearly every angle. And, of course, it is also a fantastic choice when it comes to being a good steward of your surroundings.

Building a green house addition actually boils down to making the proper decisions in the design and planning stages of your project. That is what this guide is all about. Here's a set of the green wisdom of Johnston, in the kind of tips and hints on green remodeling practices, products, and design features to help guide you in designing the greenest house addition potential.

Choosing the Ideal Shade of Green for Your House Addition If you think green is the ideal selection for you, make sure you speak with your contractor about embracing a green building doctrine, locate a contractor that specializes in green construction and remodeling, or seek out the assistance of a green consulting firm that will assist you design and plan the best, and greenest, home improvement potential. Going green with your house addition is a wise move from nearly every angle. And, of course, it is also a fantastic choice when it comes to being a good steward of your surroundings.


This last point is perhaps the most important one. It is what Johnston describes as "preventing the payback trap" Green remodeling puts an emphasis on creating healthier indoor living spaces, uses long lasting, low maintenance building materials, and moving green is dedicated at every turn to environmental responsibility. While it's tough to assign specific dollar amount to such matters, few homeowners can deny the large value of healthy families, time saved by eliminating routine maintenance repairs and chores, and the reassurance that comes in knowing that you have done everything you can to pass a better world onto your children and grandchildren. It's easy to understand that the real value of green remodeling expands far beyond the bottom line. And what if you are uncertain about going green through and through? No problem. Any step you take in a green direction when designing and building your house addition will be helpful to your job: be it increasing insulation levels, installing energy-efficient windows, or using safer, healthier building materials. But bear in mind that though entire systems construction is the greenest thing to do, it is definitely not the only option when it comes to integrating green remodeling to your new house addition plans.
Calculating the True Value of Going Green
All that said, with a job as big as a home improvement, many homeowners begin by asking what going green will mean for their funding. The fact remains that it's extremely tricky to pin a particular price onto going green. The degree of green every homeowner is ready to devote to varies, as does the individual range of jobs as big as a significant home addition. Regardless, the sooner you design green features into your inclusion, the less it will cost in the long term. What we can say, according to Johnston's wealth of expertise in the green remodeling industry, is this:
Green remodeling does not necessarily mean more expensive substances. Most green building materials are cost-competitive with conventional ones, and lots of cost less green alternatives.

Green building practices can lead to faster build times, which translates into less prices for labor.

Green construction focuses on producing low-maintenance, long-lasting structures, which means you will spend less for repairs over the lifespan of your addition.

Green remodeling is certain to decrease energy costs, now and in the long run, helping to offset any higher first costs you may face.

The real value of green remodeling is not necessarily best measured in dollars and cents.
You might be surprised to hear it, but Johnston claims to maintain the "comfort industry," not the construction business. Having said that, the green design does not only save you money, it raises the comfort level of your home, adopts higher quality construction practices and materials, and puts a premium on creating a more lasting, lower maintenance home improvement. If these qualities seem like something you might be interested in, then read up on those green building ideas that lead to much more comfortable, higher quality house additions.
Install sufficient insulation. Maximizing insulating material, be it through conventional means or using structural insulated panels (SIPs), means a warmer, more comfortable home. Additionally, it leads to a quieter home, since insulation will help to decrease noise pollution from within and without.

Get the Most out of natural lighting. Natural lighting makes a comfortable, pleasing, and inviting home environment. The more you can bring to your house, the better. FSC-certified timber, bamboo, cork, and ceramic and stone tile floors are known as some of the most attractive, trendsetting flooring materials on the market. Green renovations are warmer in winter, cooler in the summer, and you will enjoy more consistent indoor temperatures year round. All are low-maintenance, impact resistant, long lasting, fireproof, and insect and moisture resistant. And they look fantastic, too.

Decks and patios are a great, and inexpensive, way to make additional living space for your addition and your dwelling. Should you include a patio or deck into your general design, make certain to use green building materials such as composite recycled plastic and wood decking, or FSC-certified timber. Also, use deciduous trees and shrubbery to provide natural colour, and build a south facing deck or patio to accommodate multi-seasonal use.
Home additions are an exciting prospect in regards to going green. Because you are starting from scratch, building an addition onto your house provides you the exceptional chance to green the job from the bottom up, which is an ideal situation in the realm of green remodeling practices. He calls it "whole systems" Thinking in terms of systems means that each aspect of your project, from the foundation to the roof and everything in between, works together to make the greenest addition potential. That means adopting a green mindset from the get-go, one which believes everything from embracing green building practices to obtaining green construction materials to assessing every possible factor that could raise the energy efficiency of your residence. The results are certain to get the attention of even the most skeptical homeowner. Green home additions drastically reduce energy costs, raise the total relaxation of this inclusion, result in healthy indoor environments, and anxiety creating high-quality, low-maintenance additions.
Arsenic, volatile organic compounds, formaldehyde, and vinyl chloride fumes may read like the launch of a toxicology report, but it is really a list of common chemical additives and compounds associated with conventional building materials. Green building seeks to decrease the presence of the toxic chemicals and byproducts as far as possible, making your new look safer and healthier for everybody that lives under your roof. Below are a few proven green remodeling plans that will ensure the indoor environment of your new house addition is as healthy as they come. Many traditional finishing products (paints, stains, and sealants) which are used on walls, floors, and other applications, emit volatile organic compounds (VOCs) for long periods after being implemented. Low- or no-VOC products maintain these common indoor air contaminants to a minimum or eliminate them completely.
Prevent MDF (medium density fiberboard) and particle board whenever possible. Both are typical substances used in countertop and cabinet construction, and both off-gas urea formaldehyde, a known carcinogen. Should you use these products, make certain to seal exposed areas with several coats of a non- or no-VOC paint or sealant.

Install FSC-certified timber, bamboo, cork, natural linoleum, concrete, or ceramic and stone tile floors. Avoid vinyl floors, which emits vinyl chloride fumes (a known carcinogen), and think twice about carpet, which releases a multitude of toxins which off-gas from bonding substances, dyes, glues, flame retardants, binders, and anti-static and stain treatments.

Get the most out of windows and passive solar heating. The more heat that is collected naturally through sun, the less your furnace will need to run. Possessing a wealth of natural ventilation to fall back does not hurt, either.

Install filters on all taps and showers, or put in a whole-house water filtration system. Investigate the local water quality first, however, as different kinds of filters meet various needs.

Ventilate your house properly. Poor ventilation can cause moisture and mold issues, particularly in high moisture areas like kitchens and bathrooms. Mold tops the list of harmful indoor air pollutants and has been associated with everything from asthma and allergies, to more serious ailments of the immune and nervous systems.
Our current means of doing things is damaging to the environment, and conventional construction practices are no exception. Green construction reduces our impact on the environment through energy conservation, creating less waste, and using materials and construction practices that don't taxation dwindling natural resources. Following is a list of things to think about which will help ensure environmental responsibility is a cornerstone of your home improvement project. Old lumber, trim, and window and door casings can be reused if removed carefully, and if you are prepared to be flexible in regards to layout, perfectly good sinks, cabinet hardware, and ceramic and stone tile, as an instance, can all be bought from retailers who focus on reclaiming and recycling old construction materials.
Use substances manufactured with recycled content. Whether you install cellulose insulation made from recycled paper and cardboard, recycled content ceramic tiles, recycled material asphalt roof, or use concrete which has recycled material as an additive, choosing building materials that incorporate recycled material will help to decrease the amount of waste that ends up in landfills, and reduces overall energy consumption because these products require less energy to manufacture. From floors to framing materials, using just FSC-certified wood guarantees that the lumber used in your house addition was harvested in a responsible, and sustainable, manner.

Use native stone from local quarries. Doing this reduces the quantity of work, time, and fossil fuels necessary to supply the rock to your job website. You will save on material and labour costs because of this, and it is better for the environment by reducing fossil fuel consumption. A big proportion of the construction waste currently sent to landfills could be reused in future green remodeling jobs.

Increasing energy efficiency is not just great for your pocketbook. In Green Remodeling: Changing the World One Room at a Time, Johnston points out that 35 percent of their energy intake from the U.S. can result from heating, cooling, and light buildings. To put it differently, reducing the energy consumption of your new house addition is among the most environmentally friendly things you can do.
Going green means maximizing energy efficiency, and with the purchase price of fossil fuels, that translates into big savings in the energy division. A green home addition integrates energy saving strategies into each stage of the construction process, from maximizing insulation to installing energy-efficient building materials to making the most of things such as natural light, passive solar heating, and natural ventilation. Better yet, green construction uses energy saving design features that will be valuable to your new addition 20 years down the road as they will be the day that your job is completed. Here are a few things to concentrate on in the event that you plan to create energy efficiency a priority on your upcoming home addition project.
Install low-e, multiple paned windows with vinyl or wood frames. Energy-efficient windows are among the most effective ways to improve energy efficiency and reduce energy costs throughout your dwelling.

Install windows with sun and natural air movement in your mind. The appropriate placement of windows raises natural light, allows for natural heating and cooling during spring, summer, and autumn eases passive solar heating in winter and lowers the heating effects of sun during summer months. These units are a fantastic supplement to air conditioning in warmer climates and can eliminate the need for air conditioning all together in milder ones. All increase natural light in your house, so you will need to use costly artificial lighting.

Install window awnings and plant deciduous trees out East and West facing windows. Doing this provides natural color for your home and prevents solar heat gain during summer months.

Use structural insulated panels (SIPs) having an insulating foam center for exterior walls, ceilings, and flooring. Building with SIPs drastically increases the energy efficiency of your house, reduces noise pollution, speeds up setup times (which means cheaper labor costs), and conserves wood by using less raw materials.

Install above-adequate insulation during your addition. Advanced framing techniques, combining exterior rigid foam insulation with conventional wall insulation, and ensuring proper attic insulation are surefire ways to boost your home's energy efficiency. And while you are at it, it will not hurt to upgrade the insulation in the remainder of your house, either. Good insulation practices focus on sealing up every possible point of heating and heat to further reduce energy consumption and increase energy savings.

Install low-flush bathrooms and low-flow shower heads and taps in baths and kitchens. You can cut water usage at these fixtures by 60 percent or more by installing water-wise choices. Older furnaces and air conditioners are a prime culprit of high electricity bills. If your HVAC systems are beginning to get on in years, ENERGY STAR-rated, high-efficiency updates will save you bundles.

Buy light-colored roofing to reduce heat gain, and install a radiant barrier on the bottom of the roof sheathing. Doing this reduces heat gain in the summer.


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